Meet Yujing Cao, DASIL’s new data scientist!

This year, DASIL welcomes a new member of our staff, Yujing Cao, who will be serving as the new data scientist. In her position at DASIL, Yujing will bring her expertise in data analysis and visualization to further expand DASIL’s capability to help students and faculty members integrate data analysis into research and classroom work.  In today’s big data era, enormous quantities of data are available, and Yujing will help Grinnell students and faculty explore them.

Yujing Cao is excited about joining DASIL and bringing a new level of data analysis to faculty research and teaching!

Yujing Cao is excited about joining DASIL and bringing a new level of data analysis to faculty research and teaching!

Originally from China, Yujing got her bachelor degree in Statistics from Anhui University. Her passion for data science led her to a PhD program in Statistics at the University of Texas at Dallas, where she obtained her degree in 2016. Her research was on graphical modeling of biological pathways in genomic studies. She is also interested in network analysis, machine learning, and trying different tools for data visualization. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, hiking, and exercising.

Yujing was excited about the position at Grinnell because of her strong interests in teaching and in data visualization. As she puts it:

“I wanted to look for a position which provides opportunities to create interesting data visualizations along with other data analysis work. I love using graphs to tell stories behind different data sets.

Working environment is another factor that led to my decision to come to Grinnell.  I strongly resonate with the core values of a liberal arts education. At Grinnell College, I can work in an academic environment helping faculty and students while promoting the use of data in research and learning.

Yujing also discusses a number of skills crucial to succeed in the field of data science. Data science is an interdisciplinary field requiring knowledge from mathematics, statistics, data mining and machine learning. Statistical knowledge and knowledge from other fields can help form good questions and seek direction, while programming skills (e.g. joining data sets and visualizing data) are needed for implementing our ideas. To be a good data scientist, you should possess strong programming and analytical skills.”

According to Yujing, “One of the most important qualities for any data scientist is curiosity. Curiosity encourages us to dig in and make interesting discoveries about data. Also, good communication skills can make a great data scientist. You should be able to clearly articulate your results and the implications of your findings to others, including other data scientists and people who don’t share a similar background.”

Her tip for students interested in a career in data science is to keep an open mind to learn from different disciplines and sharpen your programming skills.  In addition, a student who is interested in being a data scientist should take advantage of any opportunities to get hands-on projects that use real data.”

Faculty or students interested in meeting with Yujing should drop by DASIL(ARH 130) or her office (Goodnow 103) or contact her via email at caoyujin@grinnell.edu for an appointment.

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Investigating the Spatial & Temporal Trends of Declaring a Major

The start of the school year is a time many students start putting thought into what disciplines to study for the remainder of their collegiate careers. Many on-campus resources such as the Center for Careers, Life, and Service are already in the full swing of advising students, such as the “Choosing Your Major” info session on Sept 21st from noon to 1 in the Joe Rosenfield Center. Here in DASIL, we thought it would be fun to investigate what Grinnell College students majored in over the years to illustrate the transformation of student academic patterns. Using data from the Office of Academic Affairs, Office of the Registrar, and the Office of Analytic Support and Institutional Research, we created two interactive graphics. One is a line graph presenting the number of declared majors over time from 1991 to 2015 by major and rank compared to other majors. Our second visualization is a geographic map with two layers: the US layer breaks down the proportion of students by state and major from 1985 to 2015, while the world layer illustrates the proportion of international students by country and major.

Click on the Details button below to find out more about the data for each visualization.

For the map:

    • The Contents button(contentsbutton) will display all layers. Unclick the checkbox next to the layer name to hide the layer. To view the legend, click on the “Show Legend” icon (contentsbutton) below the layer name.
    • To examine other majors, find the “Change Style” button (contentsbutton) below the layer name you wish to view, then select the desired major from the “Choose an attribute to show” drop-down menu.  You may alter the map with colors, symbols or size.
    • Click on an individual country or US state to see available data on all majors.

For the line graph:

  • Choose your major(s) of interest in the “Select a major to display” field.
  • Hover over each point to display information on a major’s rank by class year and the number of students declared. Hover over a line to view the path of a major over time.


 

 

The Biology major holds the record for most students declared within this time frame, at 53 students for the Class of 1995. Since its creation, the number of students who major in Biological Chemistry increased leaps and bounds, ranking as the second most-declared major in the Class of 2015, tied with Psychology. Economics shows a general increasing trend over time, while majors like English and Sociology show erratic variability throughout.

American Studies majors appears to be representing the South and Southwest regions of the US, while Sociology is prominent in states located in the Midwest and, similarly, the South. A large proportion of students hailing from California study the hard sciences, especially Biological Chemistry. Surprisingly, there is a significant proportion of biology majors represented in most of the states.

Scoping out, the social sciences and hard sciences are popular disciplines among international students. Economics, Biological Chemistry, and Math are popular, especially in countries like China and India. Several humanities majors are not well-represented by international students, such as Theatre and Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies.

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